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9 June 2016

The story of the business processes.
Part 3

The story of the business processes. Part 1.
The story of the business processes. Part 2.
 
A couple of months later, John came by to Peter’s office, as promised.
 

  • Hey, good to see you, man!
  • A lot has changed since your last visit; we’ve achieved some really good results!
  • Do you remember Jennifer?
  • She is hard to forget…
  • Anyway, we went on using the business process management software you gave us.
  • It has so many functions we haven’t even tried them all.
  • We started with the features that are most necessary to us: invoice and contract management, various requests.
  • Yeah, we used these features in the beginning as well.
  • We have already planned new processes to describe in the next two months.
  • We also promoted Jennifer. She is a business process manager now.
  • Now we spend less time on routine tasks and complete them in an organized manner.
  • Thank you so much!
  • Shaking hands

  • Happy to help you.
  • That is only the first step in optimizing your company work.
  • Do you want more?
  • Sure, that’s a no-brainer!
  • Let’s invite Jennifer first, I’m quite helpless without her.
  • Of course, I’m always glad to see her.
  • Discussing BPM

  • Hi, Jennifer. You look gorgeous.
  • How’s it going with business processes?
  • Everything’s fine!
  • We describe our processes and immediately automate them.
  • I do it myself. I attended a computer science class at college.
  • We have a meeting with a process participants, discuss how the process should work and start it.
  • I was promoted. Thanks, boss.
  • That’s impressive
  • Tell me, there must be some complications already?
  • Question marks

  • Yes. To tell the truth, I don’t quite understand two things…
  • Please go on
  • OK. First: We modeled processes for the IT department.
  • At first, computer engineers received tasks and completed them quickly.
  • But in the last couple of weeks I had to remind them about their duties and motivate them.
  • I do it over and over, but it’s all in vain… they don’t listen to me.
  • Alright, what is the second thing?
  • It’s hard to explain, but I’ll do my best.
  • We model business processes, which consist of sequences of tasks.
  • Somebody completes their task and then the next person does and so on.
  • But this approach wouldn’t work, if I wanted to describe business processes for Sophie, our marketing director
  • I can describe how she receives and processes requests, but it’s no use…
  • Peter asks me to do it, but I don’t know how.
  • You know?
  • Actually, you’ve done a pretty good job.
  • You’ve figured it out quickly and you are asking the right questions.
  • Thanks, John, you’re very kind.
  • Let’s start with the second question. It is a tricky one.
  • Three tools are used when implementing business processes in a company:
  • Tools for business process implementation

  • I think I should tell you more about the third tool
  • That is interesting.
  • I’ve read about it, but never figured out how to apply it in our company.
  • Yeah, it is often different in theory and in practice.
  • Let me explain this tool on an example.
  • Say, Jennifer wants to buy a car.
  • Jennifer, what is important for you, when you choose a car?
  • Let me think…
  • A car should be economical, consume little fuel
  • It should have a nice color
  • It should be compact
  • It should have a sound system
  • It should be reasonably-priced
  • Car

  • Excellent.
  • Let’s make these parameters more specific. How much exactly is little fuel?
  • Let’s draw up a table
  • Sure, that would be great
  • Table

  • Alright, now we can choose something using these criteria.
  • But first, we need to determine, which criteria are more important and which are less.
  • Can you explain?
  • Sure. All the criteria add up to 100%.
  • 30% of them is the price, 20% is the appearance and so on.
  • Oh, I get it. I’ll do it now!
  • Table

  • Yep, that’s correct. The first column contains goals, the second – indicators and the third – importance
  • Great, now I can compare three cars using this table!
  • Table

  • Awesome. I see Mercedes won.
  • Good choice
  • Only I don’t understand, how is it connected with a company and indicators? They are not cars…
  • Cars are not people

  • That’s a great question. Let me explain.
  • Peter, how can you evaluate Sophie’s work now?
  • How do you set goals for her?
  • Well, right now I don’t do anything in particular…
  • I thought about registering the number of new customers – requests from the website, calls to the office.
  • I even had some ideas how to do it.
  • OK, you start registering, what next?
  • I haven’t thought about it yet, may be I connect it to her bonus.
  • What else do you need to get as the result of Sophie’s work?
  • I need the things we discuss in the beginning of a month to be done well and on time.
  • But I don’t know how to manage it.
  • On the one hand, collecting values manually takes a lot of time, on the other her work also depends on it.
  • That’s right. Summing it up, Sophie does her job well, when:
    • Goals on customers are met
    • All the tasks are completed
    • The bonus is connected to actual results.

  • Yes and how do I do that/
  • It would take too much time to do manually
  • Yes it would.
  • However, you can use BPM software for this.
  • In theory, you create a set of company performance indicators and connect them to the employees’ performance. In practice, it works like this
  • KPI

  • In this way, we describe Sophie’s goals.
  • In the software, it is called Performance Matrix.
  • The software gathers the data and shows a table on Sophie’s performance:
  • KPIs of employees

  • Now I get it!
  • We set goals, indicator values and importance of the goals and calculate the performance in percent
  • And later on we can pay bonus depending on this percent
  • You’re absolutely right
  • But… people are not cars and that’s like what we did for cars
  • We can’t do it like that.
  • Tell me what is better,
  • if a person works hard and gets a reward for that or if they work hard and get nothing in return
  • Or maybe someone doing a poor work and has the same salary as their hardworking colleague? That’s not very fair
  • KPI tree

  • No, it’s not. That’s bad indeed.
  • There are no perfect tools, but this one can help you.
  • And you already have it in your ELMA.
  • So… I don’t have to buy it?
  • No, all these features are already included in your BPM software
  • It’s not up to me, but I think we should try it
  • Let’s go for it. You are more helpful than you realize, Jennifer
  • Yes, you are inspiring, Jennifer.
  • By the way, I could tell you more about these features over lunch.
  • Tension

  • I think Jennifer doesn’t have time for that. She’s busy.
  • Very well.
  • I should go then. I’ll be around in a couple of months. If you have any questions, give me a call.
  • You can also find more information about the system on the website and see how it works in the demo version.

John left, leaving Jennifer and Peter alone. Silence fell over the room.

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Alex
Budin
Marketing Director